Posts Tagged ‘injury’


Collage of several of Gray's muscle pictures, ...

I’m an injury-prone idiot sometimes, but I didn’t suspect that I would be a “weekend warrior”–you know, one of those middle-aged, overweight, out-of-shape guys who decide they can still play [fill-in-the blank; e.g., basketball] like they did in college or high school and end up cloaked in ice packs.

Nope. Athletic activities are dangerous. I tried to get her high awesomeness, Dr. Stephanie the PT, to agree with my theory that I used to try to peddle to myself–that only people who are athletic get really hurt. She laughed. Not the first time (although I prefer laughter to contempt–doesn’t everyone?).

Turns out either extreme ends up messing up their bodies. A confirmed couch potato like me can end up as bad off as the MVP. But where we really get in trouble can be sneaky bad habits.

So I’m typing this with two ice packs on my back and a gutful of NSAIDs because my back is spasming like crazy. I don’t do the sports thing, but I’ve been fairly regular with my workouts. Dr. S has changed jobs, so I’m a little behind on my tune-ups, but still, I didn’t fall or do any other of the klutzy things I’m noted for (I do have several bruises from the sideboard jumping out at me, the little bitch).

What did I do? I had a marathon play-with-the-food-processor day. After several hours had passed, I was pausing and leaning over the counter, spasming from the lower part of my left shoulder to my waist.

My husband diagnosed it; I know he’s right because I felt better when I did what he suggested. I’d been hunching over the counter, not supporting my back with my abdominal muscles. As soon as I sucked in the belly, things came back into alignment. It helped (along with doing my stretches and PT), but now my right shoulder is not happy with me. No carrying of the purse, no lifting of the arm. Even typing isn’t exactly favored by the tweaking muscle group.

So, kids, remember: you can get hurt with bad biomechanics any time, any place, anywhere. If you are engaged in repetitive motion, take a second and think about what muscles you’re using–is it the kind of motion that you may end up hurting yourself from. If so, figure out how to do it right.

In the case of the kitchen counter marathon, you’ve got to keep your weight centered over your legs or you’re going to start pulling your pelvic girdle and back out of alignment. As soon as one thing goes out-of-whack, the rest will follow.

The body is meant for symmetry and balance, and it will work toward resuming that state if you mess with it. Hunching over anything, even a counter or sink or stovetop, is not an activity you should be doing. Suck in the gut, and lean forward using the joints you were given for that: your hips.

I’m off to strengthen those bloody hip flexors and core abdominals and see if I can convince my shoulder to shut up. I bet you can do better than I and identify the bad body movement before your muscles, joints, and ligaments start giving you a talking to.

 

P.S. If any readers are  military brats (or know them), please take a few minutes to fill out this anonymous survey (or send it to your friends): http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/XKNQ9XV Thanks! jgm


Anyone who subscribed to Confessions of a CrossFit Fattie some time ago will know it’s been a very long time since I’ve posted.

Why?

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From chARiTyelise at etsy.com.

That big motivator of most things bad, fear.  I didn’t want to talk about what was going on. But now that I’m feeling a bit better, it’s time to ‘fess up.

Almost a year ago I was feeling the best I had in years. Well enough to go for a week to Tampa by myself to visit my mom. I was great about staying on my CrossFit workout while I was there.

And then I crashed. It took me two weeks after I came back to do much of anything except sleep. I assumed that I’d gotten those bad habits conquered, what with my regular visits to the physical therapist extraordinaire and my consistent workouts.

But I was wrong.

I hadn’t factored in what would happen when I started trying to resume a “normal” life, one with work in it. I participated in NaNoWriMo, and the writing started to take priority over the workouts. I’m fine, I thought, like any backslider. It’s just a glitch; I’ll get better.

And then November ended, and with it NaNo, and I’d completed the fifty-thousand words. And I looked upon it and found it good. I really thought I could go back to my old ways of spending nonstop hours at the computer without harming myself.

I started picking up more freelancing work. I started planning an AWA-style workshop for the new year. It didn’t happen. I kept doing the freelance copyediting1 and writing because it was fun, and it had been so long, but for the gigs with Thomson Reuters, since I’d been consistently earning any money. And I was doing work I enjoyed.

I’d hated becoming the unreliable employee that illness had made me into. I was able to be reliable as a volunteer at DailySource.org because it was a telecommuting job. I didn’t have to get dressed and drive; I just had to have enough energy to make it through my shifts and organize my work around my down times.

Now I was taking on more responsibility, and what was the mistake? The same one I’d made my entire life — that I could escape the consequences of ignoring my duties to my health. I’d think about it tomorrow.

As the new year came, I left the routine of regular workouts, becoming more and more sporadic. Not surprisingly, I started feeling worse. I was annoyed that I was losing what definition I’d gained in my arms and legs. But I kept telling myself that the occasional workout that I was getting in was going to help me maintain until I had time for more.

Yeah, right. That’s worked so well for me in the past.

And the migraines started getting worse again. And I had to be responsible, take care of the clients who expected their work to be done on time and well. So that became a priority. The excuse I’d tried to tell other people not to use, “I don’t have time,” was returning to my vocabulary, even though I knew that it was a lie. I didn’t have the time NOT to work out, because failing to do so ate into the rest of my life, taking time away to be sick or alternate between insomnia and hypersomnia. And sleepy editors are sloppy editors, so I’d be waiting for that window of time when everything was working to work.

Then I had a couple of weeks of something I hadn’t done in years, not since I’d figured out my food sensitivities and sworn off corn and dairy and kicked my Coca-Cola habit. I went on an eating binge.

cupcake tier

Cupcake tier from The Cake Shop.

That’s my oldtime modus operandi for weight gain. It had been years, truly, years since I’d last been a bitchy binger. “Bring me baked goods,” I demanded of my husband in a take-no-prisoners way. He did. I’d eat a six-pack of cupcakes and want more. I put on ten pounds in a week. Turns out one of my drugs had pooped out on me (okay, that’s not the technical term, but it captures what I mean), and it took me while to figure it out. The first thing you look for is something new, not something old, when your behavior goes wonky.  But now I’ve figured out that the first thing to think about if I get bingey is to consider any drugs that work on neurochemicals, but particularly antidepressants. It was the Wellbutrin that my brain had started to ignore, and the first thing my body did was say, “Send me sugar.” Turns out the brain’s its own sweet tooth, using a disproportionate amount of glucose, which I learned from a TED Talk2:

I don’t want one of those nasty things in my brain, although if you told me it was the only thing between me and a daily migraine, I’d seriously consider it.

At any rate, the next clue was complete lack of energy and motivation, accompanied by showers of weeping eyes. No good reason, just started crying anytime I wasn’t distracted. So I went to my friendly pill prescriber and spent the  next three months getting titrated up to an effective dose of Viibryd. It’s new, and I almost said, “No, thanks,” when she told me about it, because I didn’t want a new thing on the market. No one knows what’s wrong with it yet. All I knew right away was that it made me queasy and gave me the worst smelling flatulence I’d had in my life. Powerful bastards, too: the farting would wake me up at night as if a cannon had been shot out of my…well, you know. And I put on another ten pounds of fluff eating starchy stuff to combat the constant nausea.

About the time I finally started to feel normal again, I was knocked down by an allergic reaction to the bloody stuff.  Itchy everywhere, including my throat and mouth, which is a bad sign. I develop drug allergies every so often, and this one was acting suspiciously like the one that gave me blisters all over the inside of my mouth. Because of the depression symptoms, I’d started counseling right around the same time, and that helped me get through the tsunami of helplessness and hopelessness that attacked me.

Now that’s cleared my system, and a new/old drug seems to be working. I’m slowly working my way back up from zero, starting out at the exact same weight I was when I started this blog. But unlike days past, I refuse to stop. I refuse to let the bad juju win. I’m back to more healthy eating (no more Mr. Gutsquirm) and, ooo-rah, working out.

And life, with its odd synchronicities, sent me a client whose wife is a CrossFit instructor at the box closest to me. I pass it every time I go to a physical therapy appointment. As soon as it cools down, I’m going to gut up with my big gut and go workout in public. Then I can talk more authoritatively about putting yourself out there. Time to stop denying the importance of the social structure, time to stop assuming they’re all going to judge me, time to overcome inertia. (Or maybe just defy gravity — whatever it is that’s keeping you away from health..)

1. Every time I mention copyediting, I cringe to think that someone will read my blog and think “Who the hell is she to call herself a copyeditor?” My errors on my blog are evidence that everyone needs a copyeditor, even a copyeditor. Oh, and “copyeditor” and “copy editor” are both used by the people calling themselves that. I won’t bore you with the details. If you want me to bid on copyediting work for you, please contact  Amy at amy@indiereader.com and tell her you’d like me to work on your project.
2. I’m hooked on TED Talks. Awesome info in twenty minutes or less.


It’s like this.

This is the Tune Belt I use. Love it, but read the post for the warning!

Quick version: I’m an idiot.1

Longer version: I was in Tampa visiting my mother and went to her condo’s well appointed workout room, including industrial strength treadmills. No one there but me. View out the window of the pool and a very pretty tree2. I’ve got my Tune Belt on my arm, my earbuds in and my exercise mix playing with the volume turned up to the point just before it inflicts pain.

Now my treadmill in my home is nice, but it wouldn’t stand up to constant running and has a very laid back traction surface, one that doesn’t seem to be all that interested in doing its job. It also is a little narrower than the bad boy I was using that oh-so-fateful day. So if I do stupid stuff on my home treadmill, I usually brush some portion of the side of my body against the arms and can correct.

This kind of rasp. One for horse hooves.

This monster treadmill I was using was great — like getting to drive an old car with far more cylinders than you’re used to. “This is bad ass,” I thought, perhaps not consciously, but I was pretty pleased with myself. I’d been consistent with my exercise routine during this entire visit. And now I’m working out in what would be my fantasy home gym, all by myself.

What I didn’t take note of was that the embrace of this bad boy was several inches wider than the one I had at home, and the tread on the sucker looked like a rasp. If treadmills had bouncers, this treadmill would have its arms crossed outside the trendiest treadmill bar in town.

And then the fateful moment occurred: “ABC” came up on my mix.3

Maybe it’s because the Jackson Five’s tune hit the top of the charts in 1970. I was nine. When we got back to the states4, one of the last cartoons I gave up was the Jackson 5ive5, and it was the theme song.  For those of you who didn’t know Michael Jackson was born a poor black child, here is a video from back in the day, purportedly from the Ed Sullivan Show:

Whatever the deal is, I cannot seem to keep from dancing (badly) whenever that song comes on. It goes from audio processing in the brain straight to the movement center without consulting the part of my brain that says, “Whoa, fella, slow down.” So I started dancing within the wide arms of the treadmill and caught some part of my foot on the non-moving portion of the dance floor, sending me to my knees.

Mostly my left knee. The bad one. It’s probably a good thing I had on my yoga pants; even so, I ended up scraped by the bite the treadmill’s surface gave me, holding me down a few seconds while I processed what had happened and how the hell to get my knee detached from rotating blades6.

It didn’t bother me all that much at first; I iced it and by the next day had a big C-shaped bruise circling my knee. Bruise? No big. But when I went to see Stephanie, queen of the physical therapists, she said it was a lot looser than it had been and that I may have sprained my ACL. It’s not gotten much better since I saw her a couple of weeks ago and I’m guessing she’s going to tell me to get it evaluated by the doc when I see her next week.

I’ve been through a scaled down grief cycle and am back at acceptance. Every setback makes you want to throw up your hands and say “Why bother?” But not doing it means there’s no chance; you can’t win if you don’t play. So after enough of a pity party, and a couple of workouts I cried through, I’m back on the upswing, even though icing my knee is the order of the day and I’m going to have to rebuild it.

Too bad you can’t order bionic parts off Amazon.

1. If you’re familiar with Howard Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences, think a zero for bodily-kinesthetic intelligence.
2. Think it was an oak, but my knowledge of Gulf Coast Florida’s flora is limited.
3. Just finding it on YouTube has me dancing at the keyboard.
4. I’m a military brat. Our family lived in Japan at that time.
5. It was cancelled about the same time I gave up Saturday Morning Cartoons. Yes, boys and girls, there was a day when cartoons were restricted to just after school and Saturday mornings.
6. Shocked by the exaggeration? I’m from Texas;  hyperbole is practically mandatory.
 
 

 


Today I’m turning over the blog to Rick Martinez of Transition Possible. As the daughter of an Air Force fighter pilot, the niece of an Army Ranger and Green Beret, the cousin of an Iraqi War vet from the Coast Guard, and the mother of an EOD tech, living in a world populated with active-duty servicemembers, reservists, retirees, veterans and their dependents, I know too many individuals and families who bear a heavier burden than the average American for the various armed conflicts our country has been involved in. No matter how you feel about the politics behind the conflicts, the intrinsic honor and sacrifice of our servicemembers are not diminished nor tarnished by performing their duties. 

My name is Rick Martinez and my mission is Transition Possible. I am a retired Army nurse, an entrepreneur, the head vision-keeper of the Fitness Porvida movement, the owner of two CrossFit gyms and the founder of an organization that allows us to support and celebrate our nation’s heroes. It’s my moral obligation and I believe it is one that we all have.

Picture from Transition Possible

The parents of SPC Tracy Willis, who was killed in action in 2007 in Afghanistan. Transition Possible held a fundraiser in Willis’s honor and named the WOD “Tracy. “(Photo Credit: Transition Possible)

Transition Possible’s mission is four-fold:

  •  To positively impact the lives of our nation’s heroes
  • To encourage them to continue living and achieving through sport and functional athletics
  • To show the world that the warrior spirit can thrive no matter the circumstance
  • To bridge the gap between wounded heroes and citizens

As I post this, we are one day away from the launch of the world’s first non-profit whose vision is to create mentorship and leadership programs through which wounded heroes and adaptive athletes can find a new path or career in the world of sport. Think entrepreneurial boot camp for heroes.

On Saturday, October 6, 2012, in San Antonio, Texas, we will host the Warrior Summit II, which will bring together the nation’s best coaches, U.S. Paralympians and adaptive athletes to prove that CrossFit can be for everyone. In the evening, we will be hosting a special fundraiser (tickets available here) with keynote speaker Kyle Maynard — an ESPY-award winning athlete and one of the most motivational individuals in this world. “An Evening with Heroes” will celebrate adaptive sport and our nation’s heroes and will raise funds to support Transition Possible.

Why does this vision, this launch and this cause matter?

Let me share Mike’s story:

How a daisy-chain IED is set up. (Photo credit: GlobalSecurity.org)

Mike Gallardo is a Tribe Member and he is an amputee. His dream was to become an elite trooper, “Delta Force,” he says, to serve his country. The events of February 7, 2008 had a different path for Mike. That’s when his platoon was hit by a daisy-chain IED. That’s when he, for lack of better words, became broken.

Folks, that’s when Mike’s hopes and dreams were radically changed because he made the choice to serve. To protect us. Mike came to us some time ago, buy us I mean Fitness Porvida, and it was evident that though broken physically, mentally he was not bowed. He attacked the program and embraced CrossFit as a means to a new end. The Tribe was his new platoon.

Mike Gallardo at work … or play? (Photo Credit: Transition Possible)

The WODs were his new mission.

But where does it go?

How does that fulfill a destiny?

Even more, how does that offer a life of fulfillment where a man can support a family, start a career and be a productive citizen?

Mike was integrated into the Tribe (as we call it at Fitness Porvida), accepted as a regular Joe and soon he started a 90-day internship pilot program to test the efficacy of making a coach/trainer a viable career option.
Here are his words:

The internship helped me in many ways people can’t see. It has helped with my PTSD because I did not like to be around lots of people. The Tribe made me feel at home and that I can trust people once again. It helped with my TBI because before I could barely remember my own birthday, now I can remember over 50-100 members names. It also helped me be a little more organized because I have to plan my day and keep a daily planner for my tasks.

WOW!

Soon after, Mike was offered employment as a coach at Fitness Porvida. He’s one of the finest coaches
we have EVER had. In his words,

Fitness Porvida has been very helpful because they have set me up for success. They helped me make goals for myself and accomplish them ahead of time. They helped me become a good coach, but they still are in contact with me to make me a great coach. Not only did they treat me with respect, they treated me as part of the family.

Now imagine doing this ten-fold, folks

Transition Possible exists to make this transition possible.

Today it’s Mike.

Tomorrow … well … tomorrow depends on you.

Be a part of making the transition possible.

~ Rick Martinez


The first time I saw Stephanie for physical therapy, around six years ago, she told me there was “no time off from good biomechanics.” At the time, I was seeing her for a sacroiliac joint (SI joint) problem, and at some point I picked up my purse off the floor by bending at the hips. She stopped me and said something to the effect of “What are you doing?” and made me pick it up correctly, with the admonition “There’s no time off from good biomechanics.”

Clearly, I haven’t forgotten it. Just as clearly, I don’t necessarily heed the warning.

It’s easy to think about form and injury prevention when you’re in a workout; after all, that’s what you’re concentrating on. During the rest of the day, though, it’s easy to get distracted and do things that can end up injuring you. And sometimes it’s really frickin’ stupid things, like “watch where you’re going.” (Not so much biomechanics there, but the failure to look may end up in some funky movements.) And when you’re injury-prone, older and/or obese, you are more vulnerable than other springier, younger or lighter people.

Yep, there’s a reason I’m bringing this up.

My husband and I went to see “The Fifth Element” on the big screen last night. We’ve periodically been annoyed that we missed it when it was released, as it’s a favorite. Alamo Drafthouse, also a favorite, was showing it. The particular location has a big flight of stairs as well as escalators. I opted for the stairs, and was quite pleased with myself for getting up them without being winded or leg-dead.

When did I get hurt? In the dark-ish movie theater when we were trying to figure out where to sit. I stepped down without looking and jammed/twisted my knee because the step wasn’t where I thought it was. Ergo bad biomechanics.

So I’m now icing my knee after my workout (which was modified to keep from aggravating the injury) and seeing Stephanie in the morning. And guess what she’ll probably say? Yep, see title of post.


I reposted the Greatist Graphic that I originally posted about a year ago because I was looking at it to evaluate whether I would consider what I do now High-Intensity Interval Training…or if I could consider what I do CrossFit.

I guess it depends on how you view it. The level of exercise I’m doing certainly has sections that, for me, are aerobic, although others would find them no more challenging than getting off the couch. My current exercise regime is, however, anything but quick.

On the other hand, I came across Kelly Starrett’s blog, MobilityWod, which I’ve added on the resources to the left. I’ve mentioned him in earlier posts, as he’s a fairly well known within the CrossFit community as a physical therapist who is a CrossFit trainer (among other things). Anyway, I came across the following statement from Kelly:

I’ve long maintained that you are an infinite healing machine, at any age, forever.  This simple equation reads:  Right Lifestyle + Right Movement = Perfect Healing/Adaptation Human Machine.

That doesn’t necessarily address how you define CrossFit or High-Intensity Interval Training, but it does hit the basic point: Whatever you call it is irrelevant (except to the extent that it may indicate the philosophy of the particular program), the point is being consistent, addressing your shortcomings and doing the best you can.

The quote comes from a post called “Measuring Lifestyle and Nutrition,” which includes, in the first video (from YouTube, below), a discussion of personal biology and performance between Kelly and Jim Kean. The sound quality is a bit poor, and the conversation wanders a little, but it touches on what you can and cannot control and that there is always hope, as long  as you’re working at fixing the problems.


Yes, well, not exactly immediately after the last one, but, since I popped my head up, the rest of my body decided I needed a lie down.

I’ll pick up where I left off, and see where we go.

First, I ran my explanation of why muscles hurt with the knotting (with or without fibromyalgia) by Stephanie the Ph.D. PT, and she told me I was basically correct, but added another detail: When your muscles have those knots and refuse to relax, they fire off messages to the brain to make the other, supporting muscles stop helping out. The muscles also say hello to the neurotransmitters that are responsible for making you feel pain and say “Give her pain!!” (My words, not hers. If I’m wrong, don’t go blaming Stephanie.)

Second, I said that what I was doing was shy of the CrossFit model. I meant to refer to their model of fitness/wellness versus the how I would explain it. Reading it today, I see that it could be taken various ways, including that the exercise program isn’t the one they use.  In one sense that’s a true statement, as I have been “told” (arguably “ordered”) not to do one rep max lifts and other features of CrossFit, but in another sense, it is false, as I do believe that CrossFit is customizable. I’m going to have to rethink the “High Intensity Fitness” part, though, because the “go as hard as you can” may or not be applicable. Of course, I hurt myself overdoing one of the physical therapy exercises, so I may still be in the “go as hard as you can” mode in some ways. More on that on some later post.

What I wanted to address was the CrossFit fitness/wellness model and my quibbles with it. I generally agree, but not completely.

Let’s start with the CrossFit model. If you look at the freebie .pdf intro to CrossFit, you’ll see a really basic graph on the top of the third page. I tried to recreate it in paint, but I don’t have the requisite skills, and I’d rather spend my time cursing over my version. Basically, they propose an arc continuum of sickness, wellness and fitness, with wellness at the top midpoint.  I agree with the basic concept; my quibble is with the labels, although their definition of “fitness” is probably more what I’d consider “wellness.”

Here’s my graphic version:

At the midpoint, where the arrow is pointing, is when you’re an accident waiting to happen. Imagine moving the arrow around to where you are. I started somewhere around the border between red and orange (okay, in the red).  The idea is that the further you are to the left of the arrow is how difficult it will be to get over the hump and into the green. If you’re precisely at the midpoint, it doesn’t take much to slide either direction. Gaining weight, an injury or an illness will be more difficult to recover from as well.

So I’d moved more towards orange, and it took very little to slide back into red.

What constitute “wellness” or “fitness” is going to be dependent on a number of factors, including your age, disabilities or chronic illnesses, cumulative injuries and such. Wellness for me, as a 51-year-old with stenosis and arthrogenic changes in various parts of my skeleton, will be different from what it would have been for the 31-year-old me. However, that doesn’t mean there aren’t bits and pieces I do have control over. It really didn’t hit me until I was thinking about some of the inspirational stories and videos I’ve posted: There are certain things that CrossFit can’t fix. What it, when properly scaled, can do is help you get as “well” or “fit” as you want to be.

But fracking scale you must. If you have any kind of chronic or permanent illness or injury, take it into consideration before you suffer a setback. Get an evaluation from a sports medicine doctor or a physical therapist. That is the lesson to be learned from this model: Figure out where you are on the scale.  If you’re midpoint or tilted left, don’t be a hero. SCALE IT DOWN.

(Have I mentioned that scaling the exercises is important?)